I’m starting to believe what they say about women’s cycles synchronizing when they spend time together. Clearly the women on Twitter this week are on a mission to take down someone, somewhere. The mommybloggers are out for blood.

It started with the whole PR blackout thing. From there both sides argued back and forth till they were blue in the face, and apparently the topic even made it to the BlogHer conference this weekend. No casualties have been reported so far, so all seems well there, and hopefully a consensus was reached.

Then last night I started seeing mention of an incident that made me do a double-take. It seems at least one mommyblogger at the BlogHer 2009 conference was invited to a party held by Nikon, but then was turned away when the limo arrived to pick them up, because they had babies in tow. ‘No babies allowed’ was the rule of the evening, and when news of this hit Twitter, the BlogHers were on it like a hungry pitbull on a raw steak.

Just as viciously I might add. The hashtag ‘#nikonhatesbabies’ was quickly created, and news spread like wildfire. What started as an event to reach out to these women bloggers turned into what is likely to be their worst hurry-up-and-cover-your-ass PR shitstorm of the year.

I have to admit to being a little shocked at first. Women bloggers..babies..not allowing babies at the event? Seems like horribly distorted logic to me. Then I started reading into it.

Once you get past the OMG no they didn’t! bit, it starts to make sense. This is Nikon’s first year at BlogHer, a very important fact to remember. What Nikon saw going into this was demographics. Women ages whatever to whatever, bloggers, active in social media, average reach of whatever number audience. Just as they would with any other event they looked to sponsor. The problem came when they failed to look beyond what they saw on paper. It was not Nikon’s direct decision to not allow babies. That policy was actually dictated by the venue that was booked. Yes, Nikon was in charge of picking the place, but remember again, Nikon has never been to BlogHer before.

Women need to remember that babies and conferences traditionally do not go together. Blogher is incredibly progressive in that they welcome and help arrange childcare for those mothers who have to bring their kids. Most conferences cannot or do not make that sort of provision. Which means that there is a very good chance that this is the first time Nikon has dealt with an event of this sort that babies even become an issue.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying Nikon was any way right in this. Whoever they put in charge of coordinating this event dropped the ball. Turning away influential women you invited to a party *because they are influential* is going to land you in a little hot water, no avoiding it.

Yet I can’t help but feel bad for Nikon here. The restaurant’s policy was clear- no babies. When that venue is providing the space and the food, it’s not like they could have at that very moment picked up and moved it elsewhere. Their hands were tied, and they had to make do the best they could.

In the end, it was a mistake. A bad, bumbly mistake, but a mistake nonetheless.

One that certainly does not warrant trying to declare to Twitter and the world that “#nikonhatesbabies”. Because they don’t. They are a company like any other, who made a simple error in planning, in an arena that they are just starting to dip a toe into. They are new to this, and they made a blunder. We all have at some point.

What concerns me is what effect this outcry for blood is going to do to future events. After being labeled baby-haters this year, what do you actually think the chances are that Nikon, a large company with a lot of cash to spend, will actually sponsor future BlogHer events? Sponsorship BlogHer relies on to keep these events affordable for everyone. Again, we are not talking about a company that knew the rules and purposely stepped on people’s toes, just one who didn’t understand how the game is played, and dropped the ball because of it.

I can’t understand why the knee-jerk reaction is to make as much of a shitstorm as possible, when it seems to me all they need is a little educating. I think a few thoughtfully written letters to Nikon explaining their blunder would have been far more useful, and less likely to fuck things up for everyone in terms of future BlogHer sponsorship.

With great power comes great responsibility, and in this case, it’s being wielded about as carefully as a hyper 2 year old with a freshly sharpened butcher knife.

47 Comments on Put Down the Knives BlogHers, The Nikon Debacle Does Not Call For Blood

  1. Jenners26
    July 25, 2009 at 12:59 pm (8 years ago)

    RT @averygoodyear Very reasonable post. Put Down the Knives BlogHers, The Nikon Debacle Does Not Call For Blood (http://ping.fm/v4qY9).

    Reply
  2. Rachel M.
    July 25, 2009 at 5:59 pm (8 years ago)

    Here's what I am going to say about this (& I'm sure that even though I am a mom myself I will still get lynched) I saw these moms that night, I was heading to the Nintendo party. Both of our parties were starting late, the pick up time was 8:30. I understand that just because you have children doesn't mean you shouldn't have a social life….but at the same time you shouldn't bring your baby to such a late function. I'm sure when Nikon was planning this they weren't really thinking of babies being up till 11 pm. If you want to bring your baby to Blogher that's fine, having a child shouldn't mean you are grounded, but it does mean you have to make some sacrifices for your child. One of your jobs is to get your child in bed at a decent time or else make arrangements so that someone else can do it for you.

    I await your pitchforks and torches ladies….

    Reply
    • Candace
      July 25, 2009 at 11:58 pm (8 years ago)

      Once a child has a regular bedtime and is unable to fall asleep with other stimulation around, I agree…and once the baby is old enough to get frustrated and want to crawl/walk/run around, I agree.

      I would not bring my 10 mos old to an adult party. I would and have brought a younger nursling to adult parties. She slept in my sling the entire time. Some people didn't even know she was there. Neither of my babies took bottles and they are really no trouble to anyone at that age.

      Reply
  3. rbmmom
    July 25, 2009 at 1:02 pm (8 years ago)

    When you hear the news later that I was torn apart by Mommy Bloggers it’ll be because of my comment on this post http://tinyurl.com/mw7faf

    Reply
  4. zchamu
    July 25, 2009 at 6:12 pm (8 years ago)

    No pitchforks and torches, but I am disappointed that the first response to this very well reasoned post is a judgment call on other people's parenting choices. Surely we as mature, capable women and parents are beyond that.

    Sara – excellent post. This is the first I've heard of this brouhaha, but I totally agree that mistakes are mistakes. I guess my only question is what was Nikon's response to it when they discovered they were leaving people out due to this policy?

    Reply
    • Suburban Oblivion
      July 25, 2009 at 6:16 pm (8 years ago)

      This just went down last night, so I don't think they've really had a chance to respond yet. I really feel for the person who's going to get chewed a new asshole today over what amounts to a small mistake.

      Yes, they were wrong, but I think in this case the Twitters/Bloggers are WAY out of line. 'Nikonhatesbabies'? Give me a break. Gross over-reaction.

      Reply
    • Rachel M.
      July 25, 2009 at 6:22 pm (8 years ago)

      I can see how my comment can be seen as judgment on universal parenting skills, I find it hard to get the point across perfectly at times. But….these moms/allies are doing some massive judging too. #nikonhatesbabies? Do they really think that the president of Nikon was like "Babies? Fuck babies!"

      Reply
      • Suburban Oblivion
        July 25, 2009 at 6:29 pm (8 years ago)

        Oh I get ya Rachel, totally understand. And you are right- this was not the FU to mothers that some are making it out to be, ya know? It was nothing but an honest mistake in planning. That itself was not a big deal, but the reaction could have major repercussion with both future Nikon sponsorship, but others as well.

        Reply
  5. john coffey
    July 25, 2009 at 1:16 pm (8 years ago)

    Put Down the Knives BlogHers, The Nikon Debacle Does Not Call For Blood http://bit.ly/8RmjL (via @subrbanoblivion) I’m buying Nikon!

    Reply
  6. Paul OFlaherty
    July 25, 2009 at 6:30 pm (8 years ago)

    Sara, it's not just Nikon who will think twice about sponsoring this kind of event again, it's every other company watching the fall out of this, who will feel like their money will be better spent elsewhere and not even run the risk of such mob behavior.

    Reply
  7. Rachel M.
    July 25, 2009 at 6:34 pm (8 years ago)

    To be honest, while I think this will have negative press, I don't think this going to hurt Nikon too much. They have such a broad range of users that they should be covered. If this was a company where their bread and butter was mothers then I would understand. The commercials I see for Nikon use Ashton "Trucker Hat" Kutcher taking pictures at cocktail parties with no kids so I don't think they are running a huge Mommy campaign.

    I could be quite wrong about this though

    Reply
  8. Ellis J
    July 25, 2009 at 6:58 pm (8 years ago)

    clearly nikon's issue w/poor management from their marketing team & agency — the fact that they couldnt anticipate this being a problem – is a problem — someone needs to take the fall — expect firings

    Reply
    • Paul OFlaherty
      July 25, 2009 at 7:02 pm (8 years ago)

      Why firings? Why would Nikon expect people to take kids to a party starting at 8:30pm? I would expect Nikon would have thought responsible parents would have their babies in bed by then…

      Reply
  9. Ellis J
    July 25, 2009 at 7:04 pm (8 years ago)

    Paul – believe me, someone will get fired – the agency or whoever was in charge of this . . .

    Reply
    • Paul OFlaherty
      July 25, 2009 at 7:09 pm (8 years ago)

      Again why? Because some pissed off bloggers too full of their own sense of entitlement are calling for it? If I'm not mistaken, the party was not part of the conference, it was thrown by Nikon, the sponsor, so.. why would someone be fired because a bunch of bloggers are pissed off because they didn't get to tag along on something that they didn't pay for?

      Reply
    • Rachel M.
      July 25, 2009 at 7:28 pm (8 years ago)

      I don't see firings. Think about the situation on paper to the average person;
      "Cocktail party @ 8:30, limo service to location, booze is served, party ends at 11:30" The average person would read that and say, "Of course they weren't expecting kids, it's an adult situation."

      Now if Nikon had hosted a brunch and not allowed kids, then I would understand an uproar.

      Reply
    • Rini CS
      July 28, 2009 at 6:42 pm (8 years ago)

      I would be disappointed in Nikon if they fired someone over this. YES, it was a mistake because BlogHer is overrun with mommies. And as I mentioned, I'm not a mommy, but all the babies and infants at these loud cocktail parties bothered me. When you're giving out free alcohol late at night, you're not expecting babies to come.

      Reply
  10. Tatiana
    July 25, 2009 at 2:12 pm (8 years ago)

    @mublogger @Sundry A great post about the overreaction from @subrbanoblivion is at http://is.gd/1MouN

    Reply
  11. mom101
    July 25, 2009 at 7:32 pm (8 years ago)

    Thank you for such a smart and measured post.
    One thing to point out is that it wasn't in fact a "mommyblogger" event. The world does not revolve around us – certainly not Nikon's world – and in fact I'd imagine the photography and design bloggers were higher up on their list last night. All of whom were at the event. I feel terrible that someone was looking forward to a night out and realized she couldn't bring her child, but to attack the brands so brutally seems a misuse of power.

    And I agree with Paul, this just makes all marketers second-guess reaching out to us. Sigh.

    Reply
  12. Karly
    July 25, 2009 at 7:55 pm (8 years ago)

    I just have to say AMEN! This seems so ridiculously out of hand. #NikonHatesBabies? Really? I was at this party and people were getting so drunk and it was so loud and, seriously, I don't blame Nikon for not expecting babies to come to an event like this. I suppose they should have issued a "No Kids" message with the invite, but having an adults only party does not mean you hate babies!

    I really hope Nikon and other companies choose to be sponsors of BlogHer next year, but after this? I wouldn't blame them if they were a little leery of it.

    Reply
  13. Kristen Chase
    July 25, 2009 at 2:56 pm (8 years ago)

    r/t @averygoodyear – another post about Nikon from @suburbanoblivion. http://is.gd/1MouN {yes, put down the fucking knives}

    Reply
  14. Sharon
    July 25, 2009 at 8:06 pm (8 years ago)

    Well as far as bringing babies, I would imagine that at least a portion of the women who brought their babies brought them because they're breastfeeding. Plus, babies are pretty portable – they sleep anywhere and are pretty content to be held whether you're their mom or not. So bringing a baby out late at night, not a biggie. Older children may be a different story (and don't jump on me – I have a 7 and 5 year old so I'm not talking out of my ass)

    I think like Sara said, Nikon's biggest mistake was not looking past the demographics they saw on paper and perhaps not researching more into the actual BlogHer Conference itself. Ironically, if you go to the Nikon/Carson Kressley Look Good in Pictures Website (Carson was to be in attendance at the Nikon Party), the very first video on the page is "Newborn News" All about taking good pictures of your newborn.

    Reply
  15. amanda
    July 25, 2009 at 8:14 pm (8 years ago)

    I agree that the specifics of the party — time, location, description pointed to an adult specific party. I feel very bad for the individuals who were turned away so late, that is genuinely shitty. It was an unfortunate miscommunication, but I have to echo the sentiment that we ought not be so quick to vilify these people. Our actions end up being as much on display as theirs.

    Reply
  16. Laurie White
    July 25, 2009 at 3:16 pm (8 years ago)

    r/t @averygoodyear -another post about Nikon from @suburbanoblivion. http://is.gd/1MouN {yes, put down the fucking knives} (via @mublogger)

    Reply
  17. Don Mills Diva
    July 25, 2009 at 9:04 pm (8 years ago)

    Thank you!

    I have said it before – the more that the community abuses its power on LAME controversies ultimtely designed (I think) to drive trafic, the more people will perceive the cmmunity as lame. The result will be we will be left with less power to yield in situation's where it's warranted.

    It's always something and I'm sick of it.

    Reply
  18. Maria
    July 25, 2009 at 10:13 pm (8 years ago)

    I was there. I watched it go down. Personally, having just exited the party (and having been sober) I found it absolutely unrealistic for a baby IN AN INFANT CAR SEAT to be brought in there. Safety, legality, etc. This was not a family event AT ALL and dude… It didnt need to be. I have children and do not expect that every event or function I attend be child friendly. It is just not realistic.

    Reply
  19. Esther
    July 25, 2009 at 10:52 pm (8 years ago)

    I was one of the moms turned away & the creator of the hashtag so here's my take: First off, I don't actually think Nikon Hates Babies… maybe you have to know me, but personally I thought it would be taken as over-the-top and funny rather than an indictment of the company, or the party for that matter. I figured my friends would see it – think it was a terrible PR mistake and have a good laugh about it.

    Yes, I wrongly assumed I'd be able to bring my nursing 11 week old son because the rest of BlogHer is so baby-friendly. I still believe it was the wrong choice for Nikon to exclude moms like myself, but at the end of the day it's their choice and they're still feeling all this outreach stuff out like many other companies.

    I want to get the word out that the folks at Nikon did contact me and I went & chatted with them at their booth this afternoon – I hadn't even realized how far the hashtag had spread or that blog posts were being written. They were sincerely apologetic and seem to be using this as a teachable moment.

    Reply
    • Paul OFlaherty
      July 25, 2009 at 11:02 pm (8 years ago)

      I get that you may not have realized how far this would go, but considering the nature of the conference attendees, their proven ability to knee jerk react to things way out of proportion (see @jaymonsters comment) and that you are attending this conference as somebody who should know the reach and effect of social media, I think an apology of your own to Nikon may be in order.

      Reply
    • Jamie E
      July 26, 2009 at 2:02 am (8 years ago)

      Yeah, 11 weeks is completely portable. I would've expected to bring one that young with me too(of course I haven't been to blogher yet, but oh well). I'm glad to hear that through all this nondrama that you and Nikon had a meeting of the minds about about it.

      Reply
  20. Candace
    July 25, 2009 at 11:53 pm (8 years ago)

    I'm writing something about this right now and I want to say that I 100% agree that calling for people's heads over a mistake at a party is a bit much.

    At the same time, I think this was a perfectly avoidable mistake. This is not the first time a company has been called out for not allowing mom bloggers to bring young infants to an event. A little research into the space would have yielded that information.

    Even better, you know how all these companies keep saying why should we PAY mom bloggers to consult when we just want their reviews for free? There's your answer.

    Hiring any one of the number of highly competent mom bloggers who has experience in PR, marketing, or social media, to consult on this event would have alerted them to the issue.

    Then, they could have either held the event at a place that would allow an infant, set up a childcare suite, or at the very least made clear in their invitation that no baby of any age would be allowed in (which I wouldn't have advised, but at least would have avoided the necessity of turning people away at the door).

    Reply
  21. Amber
    July 26, 2009 at 4:00 am (8 years ago)

    I wasn't there, and in fact I've never been to BlogHer. I doubt I would bring my kids to a party that starts at 8:30pm. But that's just me, it means I don't get out much.

    All the same, when you host a party what happens at that party reflects on you. Fairly or unfairly, it's usually the person or entity whose name is associated with an event that takes the flak. They are responsible for issuing the invitations and making sure the parameters are clear. Let's say I went to a wedding at a venue where children weren't permitted. If my family was invited and the invitation wasn't clear, I would probably bring my kids since they love weddings. If we were turned away, I would blame the person who issued the invitation. Even if they had no kids of their own and so 'didn't understand', I would look at this as a gaffe on their part.

    Because of that I think it's fair to hold Nikon at least a little bit accountable. I'm not saying we should pull out the pitchforks, but I am saying I don't think it's completely unreasonable to expect a party host to indicate exactly who is and isn't welcome. Or to do a little research upfront on what sort of event it is.

    The fact that the people involved are 'mommybloggers' is completely beside the point. Let's not dismiss them out of hand just because they have children. There have been controversies and snafus at most conferences I've attended, and none of them have ever involved children or bloggers. This is not unique to BlogHer or 'mommybloggers', and I doubt it will have any long term impact on sponsorship or anyone's employment.

    Reply
  22. Amber
    July 26, 2009 at 4:00 am (8 years ago)

    I wasn't there, and in fact I've never been to BlogHer. I doubt I would bring my kids to a party that starts at 8:30pm. But that's just me, it means I don't get out much.

    All the same, when you host a party what happens at that party reflects on you. Fairly or unfairly, it's usually the person or entity whose name is associated with an event that takes the flak. They are responsible for issuing the invitations and making sure the parameters are clear. Let's say I went to a wedding at a venue where children weren't permitted. If my family was invited and the invitation wasn't clear, I would probably bring my kids since they love weddings. If we were turned away, I would blame the person who issued the invitation. Even if they had no kids of their own and so 'didn't understand', I would look at this as a gaffe on their part.

    Because of that I think it's fair to hold Nikon at least a little bit accountable. I'm not saying we should pull out the pitchforks, but I am saying I don't think it's completely unreasonable to expect a party host to indicate exactly who is and isn't welcome. Or to do a little research upfront on what sort of event it is.

    The fact that the people involved are 'mommybloggers' is completely beside the point. Let's not dismiss them out of hand just because they have children. There have been controversies and snafus at most conferences I've attended, and none of them have ever involved children or bloggers. This is not unique to BlogHer or 'mommybloggers', and I doubt it will have any long term impact on sponsorship or anyone's employment.

    Reply
  23. Molly
    July 26, 2009 at 11:43 am (8 years ago)

    You'd think that if Nikon was going to invest the money in BlogHer and its participants that they might have done a little research. It would make good business sense.

    Reply
  24. Natalie
    July 26, 2009 at 2:28 pm (8 years ago)

    Ugh, I think bloggers are expecting too much. I've never been to BlogHer, but I certainly have read plenty of aftermath posts and from what I get, there are a LOT of child-inappropriate parties. Nikon certainly made a mistake that can only hurt them, but why are people up in arms about these women who didn't even bother to check or ask if children were allowed beforehand?

    It's much ado about nothing and as far as I'm concerned it says more about the "you owe me" attitude of bloggers (not necessarily the women affected) than of the company.

    Reply
  25. CanCan
    July 27, 2009 at 3:12 am (8 years ago)

    I was at the Nikon party and commented several times how I thought it was REALLY nicely done. It wasn't just the swag-grab that some of the other "parties" turned out to be. It was a nice social event, very classy. And it was in a bar. So I can understand why the bar (probably by state law) doesn't allow kids in there. I don't see this as being Nikon's fault at all. Sad that they were defamed because of a state law involving alcohol and babies.
    Probably babies weren't allowed in the tattoo parlor either, even though it offered a BlogHer discount!

    Reply
  26. Sheila (CSR)
    July 27, 2009 at 5:26 am (8 years ago)

    Personally, I was horrified when I saw little bitty babies being dragged around like a purse at a loud, people packed party where most of the people were more than a little bit drunk. But I also know that many people would be horrified at the fact that I refuse to take my children to baby showers, bridal showers, etc. If I receive an invitation to an event in which my child is not specifically included in the invitation and/or it is not spelled out clearly if they are invited as well, I clarify it with the person I received the invitation from. I bought a breast pump for a reason – to use it when I was not able to be with her to nurse. And I packed away a shit ton of that precious liquid gold in my freezer for the times when I wasn't able to have fresh available.

    Because really, I think it's rude for people to assume their children are invited somewhere, whether it be to dinner with friends or a fancy BlogHer party. Most people I know don't want to listen to my child scream because the wait at the restaurant was longer than we anticipated…which is why I don't go out very often unless it's to a family friendly environment. People expect noisy children at Chuck E Cheese and McDonalds and TGIFridays….not a fancy french restaurant when people are celebrating a special occasion. So when I do, I don't want to "put up with" children screaming or disrupting whatever is going on, my own or otherwise. Maybe that makes me an uberbitch but I don't really care. I feel bad enough for the people who have to listen to my kids squabbling at the grocery store.

    Reply
  27. klm
    July 27, 2009 at 9:06 pm (8 years ago)

    I work in the event management field, at least some of the blame should go to the BlogHer contact person. Whoever this was evidently dropped the ball on making sure their client, Nikon, understood the details. I don't know if this person was paid or volunteer, but someone needs to clarify their job responsibilities: it's not just sharing the database so that invites can be sent, it's also making sure the client understands what's going on.

    commenter #1: It's absolutely possible for a 'babe in arms' (or stroller or sling carrier) to go along with Mom anywhere, anytime and pop off to sleep or wake up for a feed as needed. Esp. in a situation like the BlogHer conference where so many of the people around you are (or could be) in the same boat.

    What I'm curious about though is the traveling with infants and children all over town in Limos. What is the car seat arrangement?

    Reply
  28. Hyla
    July 28, 2009 at 3:25 am (8 years ago)

    Great post! I am enjoying your blog. Very well said. As woman we tend to jump the gun, and when you do that, many times there is no way to back pedal.

    Reply
  29. Melanie
    July 28, 2009 at 3:28 pm (8 years ago)

    I'm on Nikon's side on this one. I am a mother, but you know what? I would have never brought my baby/child to a cocktail party. What kind of parent would take their child to an event like that? Talk about inappropriate.

    Also, since when are people unable to read an invitation properly? Standard etiquette dictates that one should ask before bringing along an extra guest or a child if the invitation does not indicate that they are specifically invited.

    I rolled my eyes at the Nikon hash tags on twitter. A bunch of sniveling women bitching because they were offended and not catered to like princesses…Nikon deserves better customers than that.

    Reply
  30. Rini CS
    July 28, 2009 at 6:37 pm (8 years ago)

    I just want to say that I agree with you. Companies need to really consider this before choosing to sponsor. Personally, I HATE that BlogHer is considered a Mommyblogger conference. I'm not a mommy. I'm a female blogger looking to connect with other bloggers. I feel very fortunate that I have a massive blogging community outside of BlogHer to be a part of (the 20-something bloggers) — because BlogHer's preference to mommies is very frustrating. I don't think that sponsors should cater mainly or only to the mommies, even if they are a large demographic. By doing so, they push the rest of us out.

    Reply
  31. Queen of the Mayhem
    July 29, 2009 at 11:33 pm (8 years ago)

    As a mother, I understand the need to maintain a social life. However I have been to adult events where children were there and it can be quite annoying…..especially when I have gone to great lengths to garner a babysitter for my own offspring. I am shocked that these mothers thought it would be okay to bring children to a party where they were not specifically invited. I feel fairly certain that it would be clear to me that a party where I was being picked up in a limo would not necessarily be kid friendly.

    Reply
    • Suburban Oblivion
      July 29, 2009 at 11:37 pm (8 years ago)

      I look at it this way- remember that line from Sweet Home Alabama? "You've got a baby..in a bar!" It was funny for a reason, which is that it's just not done, and generally illegal.

      Reply
  32. RebTurtle
    July 31, 2009 at 7:30 am (8 years ago)

    Seriously, how many events in bars or drinking parties in hotel rooms were there at or around BlogHer? Surely Nikon was not the only party host to discourage bad parenting, just the most notable. I doubt many kids tagged along to the passion parties.

    Of course I have no perspective from this post as to what the invitees were expecting. Did the invitation state the location (bar) and intent (open bar!) in the invite? If it said, "Come to our pajama party where we will give demonstrations on how to photograph children and puppies!" I might be outraged as well….

    Reply
  33. RebTurtle
    July 31, 2009 at 7:30 am (8 years ago)

    Seriously, how many events in bars or drinking parties in hotel rooms were there at or around BlogHer? Surely Nikon was not the only party host to discourage bad parenting, just the most notable. I doubt many kids tagged along to the passion parties.

    Of course I have no perspective from this post as to what the invitees were expecting. Did the invitation state the location (bar) and intent (open bar!) in the invite? If it said, "Come to our pajama party where we will give demonstrations on how to photograph children and puppies!" I might be outraged as well….

    Reply
  34. about myself
    August 10, 2009 at 2:37 am (8 years ago)

    “In the end, it was a mistake. A bad, bumbly mistake, but a mistake nonetheless”

    Nikon, now labeled as a baby-hater company, has surely made a serious mistake with an extremely simple event planning. Even more concerning though is the bloody outrage of mommies for banning their babies in their own mommy event!

    Reply
  35. seo copywriting
    August 10, 2009 at 11:06 am (8 years ago)

    “I think a few thoughtfully written letters to Nikon explaining their blunder would have been far more useful, and less likely to fuck things up for everyone in terms of future BlogHer sponsorship.”

    You got this right, Sara. I only hope that cool heads will prevail. Every misunderstanding can be solved with diplomacy. No need to start clawing on each other when we get angry, right?

    Reply

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